Technology

Offshore wind is widely recognized as one of the cornerstones of  efforts to decarbonize global electricity production. However, until now, opportunities have been restricted to areas with relatively shallow water depths (less than 50 metres). Currently, turbines are secured to the seabed using large, deep-drilled, pile foundations.

Offshore wind is widely recognized as one of the cornerstones of  efforts to decarbonize global electricity production. However, until now, opportunities have been restricted to areas with relatively shallow water depths (less than 50 metres). Currently, turbines are secured to the seabed using large, deep-drilled, pile foundations.

This is not possible in deeper waters, however, turbines can be mounted on a floating structure. This expands the exploitable areas available  to locate the turbines which significantly increases their energy generation potential. It’s estimated that 80% of the potential offshore wind resource in European waters is in waters of 60 metres or deeper Winds here are, typically, stronger than in shallow waters,  and provide the opportunity to generate higher energy capacities.

Floating offshore wind has the potential to generate a significant proportion of the UK’s low carbon energy source, in a safe and secure way, to meet the UK Governments ambition to reduce carbon emissions by 78% by 2035 and net zero by 2050.

The purpose of the Llŷr Offshore Wind Demonstration Project is to demonstrate new floating wind technologies at a scale of greater than 12MW per turbine. Each Llŷr project location will consist of 6 to 8 turbines.

Details of the technologies to be deployed will be provided following the issue of the Test and Demonstration Lease from the Crown Estate.